Friday, July 30, 2004

Log Cabin Towels



I finished the log cabin towels today. The terra cotta is 8/2 from WEBS and the khaki is from Maurice Brassard. Both are very tightly spun and I can see a real difference between these and the ones I've made from looser spun cottons. One thing was the smaller amount of lint in the dryer tray. Also the towels feel so much smoother. I could see using this as yardage for a top. The white on the bottom is the fold up for the hem. I weave about an inch between each towel with sewing thread to reduce the bulk of the hem.

If anyone is interested, I uploaded the drafts for my last two projects - the purple plaid baby blanket and these log cabin towels.



Log Cabin Towels



I finished the log cabin towels today. The terra cotta is 8/2 from WEBS and the khaki is from Maurice Brassard. Both are very tightly spun and I can see a real difference between these and the ones I've made from looser spun cottons. One thing was the smaller amount of lint in the dryer tray. Also the towels feel so much smoother. I could see using this as yardage for a top. The white on the bottom is the fold up for the hem. I weave about an inch between each towel with sewing thread to reduce the bulk of the hem.

If anyone is interested, I uploaded the drafts for my last two projects - the purple plaid baby blanket and these log cabin towels.



Thursday, July 29, 2004

A Peek of Sun

allowed me to take some pictures of my recent dyeing. The roving was so thick that I was afraid the dye wouldn't penetrate. I opened it as I applied the dye and it looks like it got through. The rather rumpled things are silk caps which I'm going to cut into 2" pieces and blend with wool on my carder. The roving pictured on the left is not quite as garish as it looks (the gold seems to have taken over the monitor), but is full of glorious fall colors.

Speaking of fall, I stored away a few things! I remember when shelves full of canned tomatoes and peaches made me content. Now it's the knowledge that I have a full cabinet of dye stock.


A Peek of Sun

allowed me to take some pictures of my recent dyeing. The roving was so thick that I was afraid the dye wouldn't penetrate. I opened it as I applied the dye and it looks like it got through. The rather rumpled things are silk caps which I'm going to cut into 2" pieces and blend with wool on my carder. The roving pictured on the left is not quite as garish as it looks (the gold seems to have taken over the monitor), but is full of glorious fall colors.

Speaking of fall, I stored away a few things! I remember when shelves full of canned tomatoes and peaches made me content. Now it's the knowledge that I have a full cabinet of dye stock.


Wednesday, July 28, 2004

Finished Baby Blanket

I cleaned up the blanket and hemmed it yesterday. I love the little huck lace insets. The colors are just not showing up and with the sun not expected to make a return until Saturday, I'll just have to live with it. It's actually a soft violet, deep purple, and natural - all 8/2 cotton. I might do this with a heavier mercerized. I was thinking two pale shades of blue with natural. Then I could do the blues for weft and another with two shades of pinks or greens.

After I dropped TWO flourescent blubs while troubleshooting one of our fixtures (sounded like the St. Valentine's Day Massacre!) I bought "warm" bulbs rather than the usual "utility" I was buying. What a difference it made. Tish commented that I might want to try the grow lights too. I'll try that with the next ones I'm putting in.




Finished Baby Blanket

I cleaned up the blanket and hemmed it yesterday. I love the little huck lace insets. The colors are just not showing up and with the sun not expected to make a return until Saturday, I'll just have to live with it. It's actually a soft violet, deep purple, and natural - all 8/2 cotton. I might do this with a heavier mercerized. I was thinking two pale shades of blue with natural. Then I could do the blues for weft and another with two shades of pinks or greens.

After I dropped TWO flourescent blubs while troubleshooting one of our fixtures (sounded like the St. Valentine's Day Massacre!) I bought "warm" bulbs rather than the usual "utility" I was buying. What a difference it made. Tish commented that I might want to try the grow lights too. I'll try that with the next ones I'm putting in.




Monday, July 26, 2004

Q: Guess Who Has a New Home?



A: the African albino frog

Josh decided my little old pond wasn't big enough for the back yard. Now some of you may remember that it was big enough to feed a heron (see 2/03/03 entry). Unfortunately eyeing it wasn't as good as a line level. Oops! You can see my old pond shell in the background. You can also see the bricks we have for building up the one side. Once that is done, we can put the waterfall in and edge it all with big field stones. In the meantime, the frog and a few little fish are adapting well and are patiently awaiting the finishing touches - in fact, much more patiently than I am!


While I'm in this gardening mode, take a look at the pretty pink hibiscus. The white ones are still gorgeous, despite being crushed by the marauding deer. I thought it was a heavy rain that knocked them down until I saw this clue!

It was a gloomy, muggy afternoon for yesterday's Dye Day, but at least it didn't rain. I kept everything set up and today I painted some more roving and silk caps, which I'm planning to card together.

Q: Guess Who Has a New Home?



A: the African albino frog

Josh decided my little old pond wasn't big enough for the back yard. Now some of you may remember that it was big enough to feed a heron (see 2/03/03 entry). Unfortunately eyeing it wasn't as good as a line level. Oops! You can see my old pond shell in the background. You can also see the bricks we have for building up the one side. Once that is done, we can put the waterfall in and edge it all with big field stones. In the meantime, the frog and a few little fish are adapting well and are patiently awaiting the finishing touches - in fact, much more patiently than I am!


While I'm in this gardening mode, take a look at the pretty pink hibiscus. The white ones are still gorgeous, despite being crushed by the marauding deer. I thought it was a heavy rain that knocked them down until I saw this clue!

It was a gloomy, muggy afternoon for yesterday's Dye Day, but at least it didn't rain. I kept everything set up and today I painted some more roving and silk caps, which I'm planning to card together.

Saturday, July 24, 2004

Who's Afraid of a Little Rain?

At some point you just have to stop watching weather forecasts and go on with your life. We postponed a "smoker" dinner twice and finally decided we were having it last night despite warnings of more rain. Josh had the fire going by 10 and it was ready for the pork and brisket by 11:00. When sprinkles started turning to heavier rain we brough two roaster ovens up to the garage, set them at 200 and transfered everything. They had more than 6 hours of smoking, so the flavor was well infused. The salmon only needs an hour so that never made it to the smoker, but was grilled wrapped in foil. It had been absorbing the dry rub for 15 hours so there was still plenty of flavor. By the time everyone showed, up the rain cleared and stayed away for a few hours.

Now, hopefully, we'll make it through tomorrow's dye day with as few problems. Last year, when rain was threatened, we started to set up in the garage and found the lighting to be pretty poor. Today I am putting hooks and chains in the ceiling of the garage so that I can move the flourescent fixtures up from the basement. I'm still hoping that this advance planning will not be called into use.

You've got to try these - Apple Margaritas! Since we had apple cider for one of the mops, I used that instead of apple juice - gave it a rich flavor. These were a big hit and would be great for Halloween or Thanksgiving.



On the weaving front, the log cabin continues.

Who's Afraid of a Little Rain?

At some point you just have to stop watching weather forecasts and go on with your life. We postponed a "smoker" dinner twice and finally decided we were having it last night despite warnings of more rain. Josh had the fire going by 10 and it was ready for the pork and brisket by 11:00. When sprinkles started turning to heavier rain we brough two roaster ovens up to the garage, set them at 200 and transfered everything. They had more than 6 hours of smoking, so the flavor was well infused. The salmon only needs an hour so that never made it to the smoker, but was grilled wrapped in foil. It had been absorbing the dry rub for 15 hours so there was still plenty of flavor. By the time everyone showed, up the rain cleared and stayed away for a few hours.

Now, hopefully, we'll make it through tomorrow's dye day with as few problems. Last year, when rain was threatened, we started to set up in the garage and found the lighting to be pretty poor. Today I am putting hooks and chains in the ceiling of the garage so that I can move the flourescent fixtures up from the basement. I'm still hoping that this advance planning will not be called into use.

You've got to try these - Apple Margaritas! Since we had apple cider for one of the mops, I used that instead of apple juice - gave it a rich flavor. These were a big hit and would be great for Halloween or Thanksgiving.



On the weaving front, the log cabin continues.

Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Wood is a Fiber

I seem to preoccupied with wood lately. After visiting with Marie at her Funny Farm, I saw the cute little pegs she had holding her shuttles.



Yeah, I know, get rid of that speaker wire! My son gave me a woodburning tool for Mother's Day last year and I used it to transfer the Celtic knot design and burn it in. There's also a little circle stamp that I used across the top. (see the close up.) Now I have to learn how to counter sink and plug the screw hole. I also have a router I bought several years ago - just a table top model - and I never used it. Now's the time to bring it out again.

After my success with the shuttle hanger, I went on to make a holder for the pool table rake and those diamond and triangle things you set up the balls in. (you would think that if I have to share studio space with a pool table I'd learn the names) Today I'm making an insert to keep baking sheets and cooling racks upright in my cabinet. I'm in such a drilling and inserting dowel mode that my husband is getting a little worried. I wonder why he's sleeping with one eye open?

On the fuzzy fiber front, I washed up a beautiful white Coopworth lamb fleece I bought at CS. It is just gorgeous. They don't have a website, but if you get a chance to visit Hidden Valley Farm's booth at a fiber festival, don't miss it. Kate secured a couple just minutes before the vendors closed. I also warped the loom for some log cabin towels and samples for my study group.

Wood is a Fiber

I seem to preoccupied with wood lately. After visiting with Marie at her Funny Farm, I saw the cute little pegs she had holding her shuttles.



Yeah, I know, get rid of that speaker wire! My son gave me a woodburning tool for Mother's Day last year and I used it to transfer the Celtic knot design and burn it in. There's also a little circle stamp that I used across the top. (see the close up.) Now I have to learn how to counter sink and plug the screw hole. I also have a router I bought several years ago - just a table top model - and I never used it. Now's the time to bring it out again.

After my success with the shuttle hanger, I went on to make a holder for the pool table rake and those diamond and triangle things you set up the balls in. (you would think that if I have to share studio space with a pool table I'd learn the names) Today I'm making an insert to keep baking sheets and cooling racks upright in my cabinet. I'm in such a drilling and inserting dowel mode that my husband is getting a little worried. I wonder why he's sleeping with one eye open?

On the fuzzy fiber front, I washed up a beautiful white Coopworth lamb fleece I bought at CS. It is just gorgeous. They don't have a website, but if you get a chance to visit Hidden Valley Farm's booth at a fiber festival, don't miss it. Kate secured a couple just minutes before the vendors closed. I also warped the loom for some log cabin towels and samples for my study group.

Saturday, July 17, 2004

Will I Actually Make a Rug?

Catherine asked if I was planning a rug with any of the techniques I learned. The only one that I would make for a real, on the floor, letting people put their feet on it, rug would be the one made with roving. It is a fast rug to weave and is very thick. According to Tom, foot traffic fulls it slightly and increases its durability. Yes, Claudia, the fleece rug is really furry and feels soft and cushy, but I've seen them on the floor and they can look a bit ratty. I don't have a dog right now, but the locks can pull out. That being said, a nice bench pad for my loom would be very comfortable.

I have been playing around with knots on my Turkish Rug loom. Although I love the look, it is very slow and I think I would more likely make something smaller. I'm thinking that a wall hanging would be a good comprimise. After spending all of that time I could see myself being pretty protective and not allowing anyone to stand on it!

I forgot to show you what was waiting for my on my return from Creative Strands. Two pounds of white yearling mohair from Fairy Tale Farm. Gorgeous, isn't it?




Will I Actually Make a Rug?

Catherine asked if I was planning a rug with any of the techniques I learned. The only one that I would make for a real, on the floor, letting people put their feet on it, rug would be the one made with roving. It is a fast rug to weave and is very thick. According to Tom, foot traffic fulls it slightly and increases its durability. Yes, Claudia, the fleece rug is really furry and feels soft and cushy, but I've seen them on the floor and they can look a bit ratty. I don't have a dog right now, but the locks can pull out. That being said, a nice bench pad for my loom would be very comfortable.

I have been playing around with knots on my Turkish Rug loom. Although I love the look, it is very slow and I think I would more likely make something smaller. I'm thinking that a wall hanging would be a good comprimise. After spending all of that time I could see myself being pretty protective and not allowing anyone to stand on it!

I forgot to show you what was waiting for my on my return from Creative Strands. Two pounds of white yearling mohair from Fairy Tale Farm. Gorgeous, isn't it?




Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Weekend Classes

My other classes at Creative Strands included a beaded bracelet and rug weaving. The beading class was a little weird at first because I've never beaded anything, ever! Everyone else was pulling out their plastic boxes, setting up their padded mats, and taking out their extra bright beading lamps. There I was - use our what, huh? Who knew there were that many types of beads? At least I bought the kit, so everything I needed was there. Eventually I caught on and got the bracelet done and about 1/3 of the charms. The bracelet is a little over the top for me, but I picked up a peyote stitch earring kit and I think I can do that on my own.

The weaving classes consisted of a Soumak and a Fleece and Pile Rug class, both taught by Tom Knisely from The Mannings.

In the Soumak class we learned single, Oriental, open and closed Soumak, Ghiordes Knot, how to turn and work back, and how to use the Argatch Edge to work up the sides. Netting shuttles work well for all of these.

In the Fleece and Pile Rug class we first took the Ghiordes knot and used that with long locks of English Leicester, alpaca, and mohair. The woman next to me brough her own Romney locks so I tried that too. After each row of locks we wove 10 - 16 rows of carpet warp to keep it lying flat. You can see it on the pictures, but that's because I rolled the finished cloth off of the beam for you to see what we covered.

We also used locks to lay in the shed. For that we basically did basketweave (1,2 - 3,4) to allow more wool to show through. You can leave the tips, or really as much as you like, hanging out. When you reach the end of the row give a little twist and then use the rest of the lock to begin the next row. After 2 - 4 rows of roving put in 2 rows of tabby using the rug warp. Finally, using the same weave structure, we used roving.



Last, but certainly not least, look what I got for my birthday! It will be singles for a warp dominant fabric.

Weekend Classes

My other classes at Creative Strands included a beaded bracelet and rug weaving. The beading class was a little weird at first because I've never beaded anything, ever! Everyone else was pulling out their plastic boxes, setting up their padded mats, and taking out their extra bright beading lamps. There I was - use our what, huh? Who knew there were that many types of beads? At least I bought the kit, so everything I needed was there. Eventually I caught on and got the bracelet done and about 1/3 of the charms. The bracelet is a little over the top for me, but I picked up a peyote stitch earring kit and I think I can do that on my own.

The weaving classes consisted of a Soumak and a Fleece and Pile Rug class, both taught by Tom Knisely from The Mannings.

In the Soumak class we learned single, Oriental, open and closed Soumak, Ghiordes Knot, how to turn and work back, and how to use the Argatch Edge to work up the sides. Netting shuttles work well for all of these.

In the Fleece and Pile Rug class we first took the Ghiordes knot and used that with long locks of English Leicester, alpaca, and mohair. The woman next to me brough her own Romney locks so I tried that too. After each row of locks we wove 10 - 16 rows of carpet warp to keep it lying flat. You can see it on the pictures, but that's because I rolled the finished cloth off of the beam for you to see what we covered.

We also used locks to lay in the shed. For that we basically did basketweave (1,2 - 3,4) to allow more wool to show through. You can leave the tips, or really as much as you like, hanging out. When you reach the end of the row give a little twist and then use the rest of the lock to begin the next row. After 2 - 4 rows of roving put in 2 rows of tabby using the rug warp. Finally, using the same weave structure, we used roving.



Last, but certainly not least, look what I got for my birthday! It will be singles for a warp dominant fabric.

Tuesday, July 13, 2004

Felting with Sharon Costello

My preconference workshop class was Cottage Garden Vest with Sharon Costello. We were told to bring pictures, Impressionistic work well, for inspiration. Also we were to bring a simple vest pattern. As it turned out she had a sample vest with the pattern she used. It was much easier for me to use that since the 20% enlargement (to account for shrinkage in the felting and fulling process) was already done. I took several but went with this Cezanne.

The first thing we did was cut our patterns and make a sketch. Then we did an 8x10 sample. I quickly realized that I was using too small sections of color. When it was felted the colors blended too much and looked muddy. That took up most of our first 3 hour session.

Thursday we were scheduled for two three hour sessions. We cut our patterns from a very thin needlefelted batting. Then we began painting with the wool. We used a batts and roving from Harrisville. The fiber was very short with little flecks of other colors blended in. There must have been 30 different shades and then we could finger-blend into an infinite number of variations. In this picture you see one of the students working on her design. We used single needles to tack the wool down. Once we had an area done we went back with a three needle tool and did more needle felting. The cool thing is that if you decide later you don't like the colors in that bush - pull it right up! After we finished the back we needle felted one of the sides and continued the design around to the front, repeating for the other side. We worked on our designs all day, tacking the vests up on foam board and standing back 10 or 12 feet to see the whole thing. This was held in a biology lab at Bucknell so the tables were a good height. Sharon said she would keep the classroom open as long as we needed it. Most of us came back that night during the open classroom tours to work.

By Friday morning most of us were finishing up the needle felting. We only had a three hour session and were racing to the end. The next step was wet felting.



The photo on the left shows Connie squirting hot water, with a little dish detergent, over her vest, which is on the smooth side of a piece of solar covering (used for swimming pools). It was temporarily covered with an old nylon sheer curtain, which keeps the wool from sticking to your hands while you pat in the hot water. After removing the curtain we rolled up the vest using one of the noodles (also used for swimming). Next came rolling it back and forth, unrolling and turning the vest to keep felting uniform, then rolling it back up and working it some more. You can see Anita in the photo on the right wet felting. At a minimum you roll for 5 minutes, 5 times.

Once it has been felted, the vest is folded until it is about 16"x8" and then fulled. This also is repeated many times, unfolding and refolding so no creases are made and the fulling is uniform in all directions.

.

The photos above show Juday fulling her vest. During this process you squeeze as much water out as possible and try on the vest. If there is only one area that needs shrinking you can spot full. The shoulders were purposely not joined to allow one last fitting after all the shrinking is done.

Here is my vest. I wasn't able to full it, as time ran out and I had an afternoon class. I rolled it up in a towel and took it back to the motel. I draped it over the shower rod until it dried and then I put in a bag (without sealing it) Sharon said that all I need to do is wet it with warm water and continue on with the fulling process.

For more samples, see the slideshow.



Felting with Sharon Costello

My preconference workshop class was Cottage Garden Vest with Sharon Costello. We were told to bring pictures, Impressionistic work well, for inspiration. Also we were to bring a simple vest pattern. As it turned out she had a sample vest with the pattern she used. It was much easier for me to use that since the 20% enlargement (to account for shrinkage in the felting and fulling process) was already done. I took several but went with this Cezanne.

The first thing we did was cut our patterns and make a sketch. Then we did an 8x10 sample. I quickly realized that I was using too small sections of color. When it was felted the colors blended too much and looked muddy. That took up most of our first 3 hour session.

Thursday we were scheduled for two three hour sessions. We cut our patterns from a very thin needlefelted batting. Then we began painting with the wool. We used a batts and roving from Harrisville. The fiber was very short with little flecks of other colors blended in. There must have been 30 different shades and then we could finger-blend into an infinite number of variations. In this picture you see one of the students working on her design. We used single needles to tack the wool down. Once we had an area done we went back with a three needle tool and did more needle felting. The cool thing is that if you decide later you don't like the colors in that bush - pull it right up! After we finished the back we needle felted one of the sides and continued the design around to the front, repeating for the other side. We worked on our designs all day, tacking the vests up on foam board and standing back 10 or 12 feet to see the whole thing. This was held in a biology lab at Bucknell so the tables were a good height. Sharon said she would keep the classroom open as long as we needed it. Most of us came back that night during the open classroom tours to work.

By Friday morning most of us were finishing up the needle felting. We only had a three hour session and were racing to the end. The next step was wet felting.



The photo on the left shows Connie squirting hot water, with a little dish detergent, over her vest, which is on the smooth side of a piece of solar covering (used for swimming pools). It was temporarily covered with an old nylon sheer curtain, which keeps the wool from sticking to your hands while you pat in the hot water. After removing the curtain we rolled up the vest using one of the noodles (also used for swimming). Next came rolling it back and forth, unrolling and turning the vest to keep felting uniform, then rolling it back up and working it some more. You can see Anita in the photo on the right wet felting. At a minimum you roll for 5 minutes, 5 times.

Once it has been felted, the vest is folded until it is about 16"x8" and then fulled. This also is repeated many times, unfolding and refolding so no creases are made and the fulling is uniform in all directions.

.

The photos above show Juday fulling her vest. During this process you squeeze as much water out as possible and try on the vest. If there is only one area that needs shrinking you can spot full. The shoulders were purposely not joined to allow one last fitting after all the shrinking is done.

Here is my vest. I wasn't able to full it, as time ran out and I had an afternoon class. I rolled it up in a towel and took it back to the motel. I draped it over the shower rod until it dried and then I put in a bag (without sealing it) Sharon said that all I need to do is wet it with warm water and continue on with the fulling process.

For more samples, see the slideshow.



Monday, July 12, 2004

Creative Strands - The Return

It was a wonderful conference, topped off by a quick visit to Marie's Funny Farm. Torrential downpours made the trip home today a tense drive, with very poor visibility. I need a big drink and a good night's sleep, then I'll fill you in.

Good night!


Creative Strands - The Return

It was a wonderful conference, topped off by a quick visit to Marie's Funny Farm. Torrential downpours made the trip home today a tense drive, with very poor visibility. I need a big drink and a good night's sleep, then I'll fill you in.

Good night!


Thursday, July 08, 2004

Creative Strands Check-In

Here I am - back at Bucknell. As I noted, we are staying in an extended stay motel and it's working out so much better than the dorms. Carolyn brought killer roasted tomatoes and we had all the liquid accompaniments. We sat and spun for hours Tuesday night. After our first class yesterday (check Kate's blog for info on Anita Mayer's class) we ate at Bull Run, $1.50 margaritas were oh-so-good, and returned to spin and read our huge library of books and magazines. I'm taking Sharon Costello's felting class and am really enjoying it. I worked on a sample yesterday. Today we cut out our vests from needlepunched batts and start working on them. I don't know if I'll ever wear the vest, but I can see all sorts of possibilities for future projects.

If I can get my camera to communicate with Kate's laptop you'll see pictures this week, otherwise stay tuned.

Creative Strands Check-In

Here I am - back at Bucknell. As I noted, we are staying in an extended stay motel and it's working out so much better than the dorms. Carolyn brought killer roasted tomatoes and we had all the liquid accompaniments. We sat and spun for hours Tuesday night. After our first class yesterday (check Kate's blog for info on Anita Mayer's class) we ate at Bull Run, $1.50 margaritas were oh-so-good, and returned to spin and read our huge library of books and magazines. I'm taking Sharon Costello's felting class and am really enjoying it. I worked on a sample yesterday. Today we cut out our vests from needlepunched batts and start working on them. I don't know if I'll ever wear the vest, but I can see all sorts of possibilities for future projects.

If I can get my camera to communicate with Kate's laptop you'll see pictures this week, otherwise stay tuned.

Sunday, July 04, 2004

Another Find

Best of FriendsHere's another beauty I uncovered in my garden reclamation. This one is called Best of Friends.

Only two days until I take off for Creative Strands, where I'll meet up with Carolyn and Kate. I'm not sure if it's due to Kate's aversion to glow-in-the-dark religious sayings on her ceiling or Carolyn being intimidated by the squirrel murals in the stairwells, but we aren't staying in the dorms this year. Hmm, maybe I can check in early and do a little decorating.


Another Find

Best of FriendsHere's another beauty I uncovered in my garden reclamation. This one is called Best of Friends.

Only two days until I take off for Creative Strands, where I'll meet up with Carolyn and Kate. I'm not sure if it's due to Kate's aversion to glow-in-the-dark religious sayings on her ceiling or Carolyn being intimidated by the squirrel murals in the stairwells, but we aren't staying in the dorms this year. Hmm, maybe I can check in early and do a little decorating.


Thursday, July 01, 2004

Purple Baby Blanket



I finished threading and winding on the warp this morning. After a long dentist visit (which was amazingly bearable because I brought my mp3 player and listened to an Audible mystery) I corrected the misthreadings and started to weave. The picture was taken this evening under flourescent lights so the colors aren't true. It is 8/2 unmercerized, in a purple, violet, and off-white plaid. It has a little huck in the intersection of the off-whites. If you have the new Alderman book (Mastering Weave Structures: Transforming Ideas into Great Cloth) you can see the inspiration on page 105. I took the huck threading from The Best of Weaver's: Huck Lace (p. 20, 2c), but I spread the warp out over 7 harnesses instead of 4.

Purple Baby Blanket



I finished threading and winding on the warp this morning. After a long dentist visit (which was amazingly bearable because I brought my mp3 player and listened to an Audible mystery) I corrected the misthreadings and started to weave. The picture was taken this evening under flourescent lights so the colors aren't true. It is 8/2 unmercerized, in a purple, violet, and off-white plaid. It has a little huck in the intersection of the off-whites. If you have the new Alderman book (Mastering Weave Structures: Transforming Ideas into Great Cloth) you can see the inspiration on page 105. I took the huck threading from The Best of Weaver's: Huck Lace (p. 20, 2c), but I spread the warp out over 7 harnesses instead of 4.